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As far as I know, you can take the equation $pv=RT$ (with $v$ being the specific volume) for ideal gases. But I had a question in a quiz asking about this, and the answer was "dependent on temperature only" (for liquids, which ain't exactly ideal gases). I just can't find the right equation to prove this. What am I missing?

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    $\begingroup$ Can you provide any additional information? The specific volume of liquids depends on pressure also (although to a lesser extent than gases), so the answer appears incorrect. $\endgroup$ – Chemomechanics Feb 25 '19 at 18:09
  • $\begingroup$ There appears to be a disconnect. The equation applies only to ideal gases and has nothing to do with liquids. Please describe the quiz question in its entirety. $\endgroup$ – Bob D Feb 25 '19 at 18:20
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Look at the schematised $p,V,T$ diagram of a non-ideal gas:

Non-ideal gas p,V,T diagram Image source.

Left is the liquid area of the diagram. One can see that the volume has a small dependence on pressure (liquids are said to incompressible: $\frac{\partial V}{\partial p} \approx 0$) but has a stronger dependence on temperature.

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