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According to Wikipedia,

The approximate grand unification energy value is equal to $1×10^{25}$ eV or $10^{16}$ GeV

This is equal to $1602176$ J.
Now,

The Earth receives 174 petawatts (PW) of incoming solar radiation (insolation) at the upper atmosphere

This is solar radiation which is equal to $1.74×10^{17}$ J
My question is, Since solar radiation is way above the unification scale, near sun, Do forces in nature unify?
PS: Apologies if this was a stupid question, I'd appreciate if someone pinpoints and explains where I went wrong (If I did).

Links for reference:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_energy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_unification_energy

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    $\begingroup$ You've got a misunderstanding. The grand unification energy of $10^{16}$ GeV is meant as an energy of a single particle. But the solar radiation energy is the energy of many photons. $\endgroup$ – Thomas Fritsch Feb 24 at 17:24
  • $\begingroup$ @ThomasFritsch You should make that an answer. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Feb 24 at 17:43
  • $\begingroup$ The typical visible photon from the Sun has an energy of only 2-3 eV, more than a trillion trillion times lower than the Grand Unification energy. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Feb 24 at 17:46
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You've got a misunderstanding.

The grand unification energy of $10^{16}$ GeV is meant as an energy of a single particle.

But the solar radiation ($1.74 \cdot 10^{17}$ J/s) is the energy of many photons. A single solar photon has an energy of only a few eV.

By the way: Even the particle energies achieved with our most powerful accelerators (like the LHC) are "only" in the TeV range.

So, we are far off from grand unification.

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