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I’m currently doing an observational study of the moon that’s been a passion of mine for the last few years. I’ve found I can see the moon all the way to almost full at about midday). Added I can see all moon phases most of the night and in sunlight while it moves from the 1st quarter all the way trough the 4th quarter. Simply said, the only time I’m not able to see the moon during the day is at the new moon and maybe a day later.

My question is, how I can see an almost full moon at midday if it should have set and be on the opposite side of the earth illuminating Asia? The angles and orbits are not lining up!

Link to help understand foundation of question. https://youtu.be/-u4MtmIuFBw

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    $\begingroup$ Hi and welcome to physics SE. Please, use a more formal language in the site. You should edit your question and choose an appropiate title, which describes the idea of your question, like "Why can the moon be seen at midday?" (if so), we are not here to silence any friend of yours. Try to clarify the content as well. Thank you. $\endgroup$ – FGSUZ Feb 19 '19 at 20:51
  • $\begingroup$ I think it may be a question of your subjective (human) judgement of the phase of the moon and its position in the sky. Please let us know what time this full moon first rises above the horizon and what time is sets below the horizon. $\endgroup$ – Kantura Feb 19 '19 at 20:55
  • $\begingroup$ In the linked video I cannot see anything surprising. We see a moon (not quite full) at a small angle above the horizon, opposite to the sun, which also appears at small angle above the horizon. I agree with the other comments, that for a physical analysis, the key data are missing: time of day, azimuth and inclination of moon and sun. Also missing is some effort of yourself trying to understand the phenomenon in terms of physics. $\endgroup$ – flaudemus Feb 19 '19 at 20:56
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    $\begingroup$ Arguing with a flat earther isn't worth it. It's like wrestling with a pig in the mud, you both get dirty, but the pig likes it. $\endgroup$ – TheAverageHijano Feb 19 '19 at 21:50
  • $\begingroup$ Hmm...I made a comment earlier, but it's gone now. Did a mod delete it? $\endgroup$ – Bill N Feb 19 '19 at 22:08
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If you read the details of the video you posted, you'll see that it was taken on April 8, 2017 6:30 PM in Lewiston, NY. This location is about 43°10'N 79°02'W. At this time, day and location the Moon was at altitude of 11° and azimuth 95°, while the Sun was almost in the opposite azimuth, 267°, with similarly small altitude of 14° (it's 1.35 hours before sunset). Since the Sun is almost opposite of the Moon in the sky, it's no wonder that you can see almost full Moon.

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