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If the center of a black hole is an one-dimensional point, gravitational singularity, where density and gravity become infinite and space-time curves infinitely, then / why:

  1. If spacetime is warped almost infinitely, why isn't it warped to the point where it would pinch off the singularity from regular space-time? (basically pinched off in its own spacetime)

  2. How does a 1 dimensional item affect 4 dimensional space?

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm not sure if I get the question. Could you explain the confusion a bit more? $\endgroup$ – Nat Feb 10 at 0:52
  • $\begingroup$ who says black holes are one dimensional? $\endgroup$ – N. Steinle Feb 10 at 1:54
  • $\begingroup$ I think you are mixing up "1D space" with "a point in 4D space" $\endgroup$ – user8408080 Feb 10 at 2:02
  • $\begingroup$ I have read online such as physics of the universe, that a black hole singularity was 1 dimensional. However, I also read that the University of Cambridge simulated a 5-dimensional black hole. $\endgroup$ – Rick Feb 10 at 2:11
  • $\begingroup$ "If the center of a black hole is an one-dimensional point" - A point is not one-dimensional. A point has no dimensions, zero. Also, a black hole does not have a point-like "center". A singularity is not a point, but is infinitely long. $\endgroup$ – safesphere Feb 13 at 10:13
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It's not really true that a black hole singularity is one-dimensional. Actually general relativity doesn't provide a well-defined answer to the question of how many dimensions it has. See Is a black hole singularity a single point? .

If spacetime is warped almost infinitely, why isn't it warped to the point where it would pinch off the singularity from regular space-time? (basically pinched off in its own spacetime)

If you want to learn about this kind of thing, the phrase to google on is "topology change." General relativity predicts that under a certain set of reasonable assumptions, topology change never occurs. Specifically, it predicts that there is no topology change when matter undergoes gravitational collapse to form a black hole.

We don't actually have any empirical data on the kind of extreme spacetime curvatures that occur when a singularity forms, so it's hard to know whether we should believe GR on this prediction or not. Probably the only way we would get empirical evidence would be if gravitational collapse can form naked singularities, violating the cosmic censorship hypothesis. Some reputable relativists actually think this is a serious possibility for real-world gravitational collapse of stars, but it's not a majority opinion.

How does a 1 dimensional item affect 4 dimensional space?

Well, we can't really say it's one-dimensional, but anyway it's not valid to think of the singularity as affecting the surrounding spacetime. The singularity lies in the future light cone of all observers, so it can't cause anything to happen. For a real-world black hole that forms by gravitational collapse, the effect on the outside universe is basically just the gravitational field of whatever matter formed the black hole originally.

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There are no actual blackholes.the thing we say blackhole is actually ECO(eternally collapsing object).ECO cant never be collapsed into a singularity as their exsists radiation pressure.and if a object curves spacetime it affects 4D space time and for curving in space time object should exsists in space time of 4D.

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