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When a body is acted by a force such that it begins to move. In that case which friction is applicable? Is it the static friction as that would give a minimum value of force required to move the body? Or is it the Kinetic friction as the body has already started moving?

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  • $\begingroup$ Always kinetic when it moves. And static when it doesn't. Always. $\endgroup$ – Steeven Feb 7 at 5:51
  • $\begingroup$ Your question is answered on a HyperPhysics page via a quick Google search. $\endgroup$ – GodotMisogi Feb 16 at 3:32
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Just before the body starts moving, you must use the static coefficient of friction, which is always bigger than the kinetic one. Once the body is set in motion, whether this is uniform or accelerated, you must instead use the kinetic coefficient of friction.

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Static friction is the friction applicable to impending motion. The coefficient of static friction is generally greater than the coefficient of kinetic friction. Once the maximum static friction force is reached, and motion begins, the friction force decreases to the kinetic friction force, meaning less applied force is needed to keep the object moving.

The figure below, which is an idealized friction model (friction being more complicated) shows the relationship between applied force and friction force.

Hope this helps. enter image description here

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