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The speed of light can be calculated by Maxwell's equations, which tell us that light is an electromagnetic wave.

How does the particle theory of light account for the constant speed of light?

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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate: physics.stackexchange.com/q/3541/50583 and its linked questions $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Feb 3 at 13:29
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    $\begingroup$ Particle theory is for modeling how particles interact with each other, it's not so helpful in modeling how they move. $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Feb 3 at 13:30
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The particle theory of light is part of the standard model , and it has built in Lorenz transformations and thus axiomatically the speed of zero mass particles, as photons are, is the classical value c by construction of the model. Call it an axiomatic result.

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