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Does charge of the body gets affected by relativity or is constant in all frames of references?

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The Lorentz transformations affect position and time, not the charge. Therefore, charge is invariant but the current (i.e. $q\mathbf v$) is not.

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  • $\begingroup$ Does it imply that magnetic effects are relative?(because of is dependence on current) $\endgroup$ – Nithish Jan 30 at 15:33
  • $\begingroup$ @Nithish Yes, of course. Both magnetic and electric field are quantities that depend on the reference frame. $\endgroup$ – Alessandro Zunino Jan 30 at 15:36
  • $\begingroup$ @Nithish Correct. Electric and magnetic fields convert to each other depending on the frame. They are temporal and spatial projections of the electromagnetic field. A static charge has no magnetic field. A charge moving close to the speed of light has almost no electric field. $\endgroup$ – safesphere Jan 30 at 15:40
  • $\begingroup$ @safesphere your wording is incorrect. The electromagnetic tensor is not invariant, it just transforms following the Lorentz transformations. $\endgroup$ – Alessandro Zunino Jan 30 at 15:42
  • $\begingroup$ @AlessandroZunino: This answer could be improved by citing the experimental evidence, which basically comes from bounds on the net charge of atoms. BTW, it's perfectly correct to say that a tensor is invariant. People who prefer to describe it that way will say that the tensor is invariant, but its components depend on what coordinates you use to describe it. $\endgroup$ – Ben Crowell Jan 30 at 17:00
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That the charge of a body is constant in all frames of reference is proved in several textbooks.

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