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I am trying to understand charge what it is actually and how electrons have negative charge like suppose I assume that scientist assume protons have something because of which they behave like that (attract other electrons and repel other protons) but what do they mean by electron have negative of that thing.how can something have negative of a thing.

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marked as duplicate by Kyle Kanos, John Rennie, user191954, WillO, M. Enns Jan 27 at 3:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ I'm rolling back to v4 because the "That is why I hate studies how the hell I am supposed to get answers everytime" does not add anything to the question and is off-putting, and the "HOW" is aggressive and space-consuming. Please do not add that back. $\endgroup$ – user191954 Jan 26 at 14:43
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    $\begingroup$ I've deleted some obsolete and/or inappropriate comments and responses to them. Anirudh, please note that Chair is right that certain things shouldn't be included in questions here. It's best to keep questions focused. It doesn't matter too much in this case because the question is a duplicate, but it's something useful to keep in mind for the future: when people edit your question, most of the time they're helping you out by improving your question so that it's less likely to get downvoted, closed, or deleted. $\endgroup$ – David Z Jan 27 at 7:00
  • $\begingroup$ the question is not a duplicate please see description before saying $\endgroup$ – Anirudh Gulati Jan 27 at 7:14
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidZ Since there are some good answers here, do you think it would be possible to lock the question in v6, to aid future readers? $\endgroup$ – user191954 Jan 27 at 14:38
  • $\begingroup$ No answer here is right here $\endgroup$ – Anirudh Gulati Jan 27 at 15:14
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One should first remember that this is largely conventional and very convenient.

When discussing the force between charges, what one wants out of these assignments is to get the same qualitative behaviour for two like charges, and a different qualitative behaviour for different charges, and giving a algebraic sign to charges does just this because the product of two negative numbers is positive, the product of two positive numbers is positive, but the product of one positive and one negative number is negative.

It is also convenient because we often need to compute the net amount of charge on an object, and we know how to add positive and negative numbers.

As far as Coulomb’s law goes, another way to handle the repulsive or attractive nature of the interaction could have been as follows: assign the number 0 to one type of charge, the number 1 to the other type. When you bring them close together they attract if the sum of their “number” is odd, and repel if it is even. This rule would not work if you need to add the charges, such as a situation where a type 0 charge would be made close to another object containing a number of charges of type 1 and type 0.

So it’s not so much that the electron charge is negative and the charge of the proton is positive (indeed the assignment of the algebraic sign could have been reversed without problem provided everything other assignment of the algebraic sign was also reversed), but it’s that these charges are of different types, and that assigning a positive or negative value to these makes it easy to algebraically add or multiply the signed quantities when needed.

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  • $\begingroup$ are u sure that my assumption that scientist assume that protons have something because of which they behave like that (attract other electrons and repel other protons) is correct ?can I build my understanding on this and acquire no problems in entrance exams related to my basic understanding of charges? $\endgroup$ – Anirudh Gulati Jan 26 at 6:40
  • $\begingroup$ @AnirudhGulati, there is no assumption that protons having a positive charge is correct. That assignment is arbitrary, and BY DEFINITION, protons have a positive charge. Because that positive charge is a defined entity, it is not open to debate. $\endgroup$ – David White Jan 26 at 17:13
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If you rub two objects together you find that after being rubbed some objects attract one another and others repel one another.
Benjamin Franklin used what is called a "single fluid model" whereby rubbing either increases the amount of fluid in a body by fluid being transferred from the object doing the rubbing to the object being rubbed or conversely the rubbed object had less fluid by the transference of fluid.
If an object had more fluid it was called positively charged and an object with less fluid was negatively charged and these are terms that Franklin introduced.

It was surmised that if two objects with an excess or a deficit of fluid repelled one another (like charges repel) and an object with an excess of fluid attracted an object with a deficit of fluid (opposite charges attract).

We now believe that it is electric charges (electrons) which are transferred from one object to another during the rubbing process.

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  • $\begingroup$ sir the problem is they say protons have positive charge and electrons have negative charge how could electrons have something negative like I explained if I assume scientist assume protons have something because of which they behave like that (attract other electrons and repel other protons) but what do they mean by electron have negative of that thing.how can something have negative of a thing $\endgroup$ – Anirudh Gulati Jan 24 at 12:10
  • $\begingroup$ @AnirudhGulati What I tried to explain is the reason why Franklin called one type of charge negative. That label has stuck but the theory has moved on. So now in the context of charge negative is the posited of positive and adding one negative charge to one positive charge gives you no charge. $\endgroup$ – Farcher Jan 24 at 12:42
  • $\begingroup$ what is posited and are u sure that my assumption that scientist assume that protons have something because of which they behave like that (attract other electrons and repel other protons) is correct ?can I build my understanding on this and acquire no problems in entrance exams related to my basic understanding of charges? $\endgroup$ – Anirudh Gulati Jan 24 at 13:13
  • $\begingroup$ I didn't downvote so please tell me $\endgroup$ – Anirudh Gulati Jan 26 at 6:40

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