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Can we artificially create extremely high frequency waves in the ( order of 10^60 )? how hard is it to create high frequency waves, and what limits are potential in doing so...

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  • $\begingroup$ Why $10^{60}$? Is there something special about the exponent 60? Is this in units of Hz? $\endgroup$ – Ben Crowell Jan 19 at 15:48
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That's probably impossible, since the wavelength is 16 orders of magnitude smaller than the Planck length. From the Planck–Einstein relation, $E = h\nu$, a single such photon would have energy equivalent to about 7.4 million tonnes, and its Schwarzschild radius would be about $10^{-17} m$, much larger than the wavelength, thus the photon would be a black hole.

It's probably impossible to pack that much energy into such a tiny space. The universe might have acheived that sort of energy at the very start of the Big Bang, but I expect that quantum effects prohibited that, although we need a theory of quantum gravity to address such questions.

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  • $\begingroup$ could you please explain your answer in latman $\endgroup$ – Mundaplackal Jan 19 at 13:40
  • $\begingroup$ layman terms , i am not yet a college student, so i dont quite know what you are talkibg $\endgroup$ – Mundaplackal Jan 19 at 13:41
  • $\begingroup$ @Mundaplackal the one-word answer is "No" and the one-sentence answer is "because of quantum mechanics and relativity." If you don't know anything about quantum mechanics and relativity, it's hard to take the explanation much further than that. $\endgroup$ – alephzero Jan 19 at 13:58
  • $\begingroup$ @Mundaplackal It's hard to break my answer down into simpler terms, especially when I don't know the level of your knowledge. I added a little more info, and some links that might be helpful. But if you have a specific question about anything in this answer, please let me know. $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Jan 19 at 14:08

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