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I'm in my bachelor in physics. In a couple of weeks I start my last year, and I'm interested in taking some pure math courses. As you see, I like the theoretical point of view, but I don't know if the courses I want to take are useful.

Do you think that a course in topology is useful?

I know that it is used in condensed matter physics, and string theory. Wouldn't it be better to study it from the physical point of view?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Qmechanic Jan 17 at 19:26

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Well, topology is interesting in its own right. I think it is useful. $\endgroup$ – Žarko Tomičić Jan 17 at 19:00
  • $\begingroup$ Try Bott & Tu's Differential Topology. As an added bonus you will learn about differential forms. $\endgroup$ – Mozibur Ullah Jan 17 at 19:17
  • $\begingroup$ Out of curiosity, what do you mean when you talk about studying topology "from the physical point of view"? $\endgroup$ – probably_someone Jan 17 at 19:28
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    $\begingroup$ If you plan to study condensed matter or string theory, having a solid mathematical background in topology is certainly a strong advantage. However if you follow a course in mathematics it may be that they focus on many details on the foundations and only scratch the surface of the things you may be interested in (because they'll have more advanced courses for those). My advice is to ask the professor what topics will be covered and have a general idea of what you want to learn. Some physics oriented books about topology might help you out in this. Check Dubrovin-Novikov-Fomenko and Nakahara. $\endgroup$ – MannyC Jan 17 at 19:44
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    $\begingroup$ Topology is useful in physics, but I would give higher priority to group theory. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Jan 18 at 0:16