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How much would the percentage of CO2 in a room need to change in order to make a measurable change (using transient hot wire method) to the thermal conductivity of the air inside room? Are there other changes to the air composition that could drive a significant change in the thermal conductivity?

Thermal conductivity just happens to be the easiest air parameter for me to instrument, I'm looking for ways to modify the air in a sealed space and then sense when the space becomes open by measuring the conductivity (or whatever else will do it) as it equalise with the bulk atmosphere.

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I don’t think you can get enough CO2 into room air to have a signal and still breathe it.

Humidity might be a much stronger signal. Particularly at just above room temperature, the thermal conductivity varies significantly with humidity:

enter image description here

(From here, which has more info)

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