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So the universe is ever-expanding. It's been expanding in all directions since the Big Bang, like how a sponge expands when you give it water. The universe is made of a fabric known as space-time. The expansion of the universe, of space-time, is how we experience time. And when our speed increases between 2 reference points, we are moving with that expansion between the two reference points. Which is why the moving object experiences time slower, because space-time is not moving through that object as quickly. I know this isn't perfect, but do I have the right idea?

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closed as off-topic by niels nielsen, ZeroTheHero, Dale, WillO, John Rennie Jan 14 at 12:44

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "We deal with mainstream physics here. Questions about the general correctness of unpublished personal theories are off topic, although specific questions evaluating new theories in the context of established science are usually allowed. For more information, see Is non mainstream physics appropriate for this site?." – niels nielsen, ZeroTheHero, Dale, John Rennie
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    $\begingroup$ what books on this subject have you read? $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Jan 14 at 2:44
  • $\begingroup$ @nielsnielsen none really, just learned about it casually through google i guess $\endgroup$ – Jonah Cooper Jan 14 at 2:52
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    $\begingroup$ Unfortunately your question will not be taken seriously: this is not an opinion poll. $\endgroup$ – ZeroTheHero Jan 14 at 3:03
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The first three sentences are OK. The others aren’t.

“The expansion of the universe, of space-time, is how we experience time.” Speculative. Most physicists think we would experience time just fine in a non-expanding universe.

“And when our speed increases between 2 reference points, we are moving with that expansion between the two reference points.” Depends on what you mean by “with”. If you mean that the universe is expanding at the same time that the object is moving, that’s true. If you mean that the expansion is what is making the object move, that’s false in general.

“Which is why the moving object experiences time slower, because space-time is not moving through that object as quickly.” Just plain wrong. A moving clock runs slower than a stationary clock even in a non-expanding universe.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the feedback. Is there such a thing as a non-expanding universe? $\endgroup$ – Jonah Cooper Jan 14 at 3:31
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einstein%27s_static_universe. More importantly, the Minkowski space of Special Relativity doesn’t expand, but time passes along just fine, with time dilation for moving clocks. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Jan 14 at 3:34

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