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I’m studying Hydraulics, and this week we’re talking about viscosity and fluid properties and I came across this question but I can’t find the answer anywhere in my books. Please help.

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  • $\begingroup$ What about the freezing point? $\endgroup$ Jan 14 '19 at 4:35
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In the context of petroleum products, that temperature is called the pour point. It varies greatly, depending on the average molecular weight of the product- in general, lower M.W. means a lower pour point temperature.

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  • $\begingroup$ But then there is the pitch drop experiment. Less than a drop per year. $\endgroup$
    – user137289
    Jan 13 '19 at 22:01
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    $\begingroup$ the petroleum community can't wait a year for a pour point determination ;-) $\endgroup$ Jan 13 '19 at 22:41
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I believe at 0K temperature and pressures below 25 atm, Helium will still be a fluid.

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  • $\begingroup$ Indeed ... the question does not have a "reasonable" answer without knowing more about the properties of the fluid in question. $\endgroup$ Jan 14 '19 at 3:02

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