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When opening a bottle of soda (any carbonated drink) some of the 'fizz' rushes out. When you replace the cap, CO2 from the soda migrates to fill the empty space in the bottle and eventually an equilibrium is reached. When you open the bottle again, that released CO2 will escape again. Or so is my layman's understanding...

Does the temperature of the soda/bottle affect how much fizz is lost to the empty space (i.e. that you subsequently lose by opening the bottle)? Maybe if the bottle is warmer, the warm air in the empty space will not accept as much CO2?

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  • $\begingroup$ care to share a reason for the downvote? $\endgroup$ – afuna Jan 15 at 6:35
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The main driving force in this situation is not so much the temperature of the air as it is the temperature of the carbonated water. CO2 is less soluble in warm water than cold, so as the bottle sits out and warms up, the CO2 wants to come out of solution and builds up pressure in the bottle. Chilling the bottle enhances the solubility of the CO2 and so it slows this process down.

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