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I wonder is it possible. in highly compressed objects, such as neutron stars and black holes, (I'm not sure that this applies to singularities), that the physical conditions within these objects partially mimic the conditions assumed to exist shortly after the big bang, particularly with regard to the boson meditated interactions of the standard model.

My question is whether the assumed convergence of coupling constants on these scales is taken into account when we try to model these systems and whether (probably unanswerable), this may prevent the formation of a singularity.

As far as I know, current experimental evidence does give some support to the idea that at high enough energies, unification of coupling constants is a possibility.

To summarise, I am wondering if, beneath the event horizon of a collapsed star, there still may exist a recognisable physical object, due ( in some handwavy way), to unification/convergence/modification of coupling constants?

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The short answer is no. Compressed objects form from gravitational interactions, and the unification of coupling constants at some unification scale would only alter the type of matter being compressed, and not the nature of the compression itself. In order to resolve a singularity, one would need a modification of General Relativity at high energies, which is the nature of the study of quantum gravity, the characteristic energy scales of which are much, much, higher than the expected unification scale of the standard model gauge theory.

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