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This question already has an answer here:

What exactly is gravitational attraction? In my textbook it was quoted " all objects both tiny and large objects are attracted to the earth. This is known as gravitational attraction, or the force due to gravity". But the force due to gravity is weight. I think that gravitational attraction is the action of attraction and is different from the force due to gravity (weight). Pls clarify.

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marked as duplicate by Aaron Stevens, Buzz, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, ZeroTheHero Dec 27 '18 at 15:05

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All objects with mass, meaning all objects, generate a gravitational field. In doing so, they are attracted to other objects by a gravitational force between any two objects that can be calculated by the well known equation $F = Gm_1m_2/r^2$. This force of gravitational attraction exists when you are in free fall and when you are standing on the surface of the earth.

Weight is normally determined when you step on a scale, depress the springs in that scale, and take a measurement off of a dial of some sort. When you step on the scale, you are pushing on it due to the force of gravitational attraction between you and the earth. The opposing force from the scale, due to Newton's third law, is the normal force that the scale puts back on the bottom of your feet, and that force is in the upwards direction. It is actually the normal force from the scale that is displayed on the scale's dial, and this reading is what you call your weight.

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In simple terms, the tendency for objects to free-fall towards one another illustrates gravitational attraction. If that tendency is opposed, as for example by the presence of the surface of a planet that you are standing on, then you will experience a force between your body and the planet that is called your weight.

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They actually are the same thing. However, you could also talk about "apparent weight", which is given by $m(g+a)$ where $m$ is your mass, $g$ is the local acceleration due to gravity, and $a$ is your acceleration. This is why you feel "weightless" when falling ($a=-g$) or feel heavier when you are in an elevator accelerating upwards ($a>0$).

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