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Im gonna dive straight to the point:

If you run some current through, say, copper wire you will get a magnetic field around it; that is how the gauss guns work.

My questions are:

1) Is it possible to get magnetic field around an ideal conductor

2) Will the magnetic field have less strenght in comparison with ohmic conductor of n-resistance?

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  • $\begingroup$ Perfect question. The extremely situation, you asked about, should be for superconductors resp. a stream of electrons in a vacuum tube. $\endgroup$ Dec 25 '18 at 12:05
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The answer is that there will be a magnetic field around it, directly related to the current in the wire. This is true both for ideal and non-ideal conductors. The current produces the magnetic field; and the relation between magnetic field and current is identical in the two cases. Maxwell's equations are the place to go to get a clear understanding of the reasons.

There are instruments that measure the current in a wire, simply by measuring the strength of the magnetic field around the wire.

Note that some of our strongest electromagnets are superconductive magnets, wound with superconductive wire (or ribbon).

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  • $\begingroup$ Running a beam of electrons in a collider with 0,99c, how much the electrons electric field gets weaken and what’s the value of the electrons magnetic field? $\endgroup$ Dec 28 '18 at 16:05

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