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This question already has an answer here:

In two-cell flash light,the batteries are usually connected in series. Why not connect them in parallel?

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marked as duplicate by StephenG, John Rennie, stafusa, Martin, Qmechanic Dec 13 '18 at 9:11

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I'm sure someone has a more technical answer, but you can thing of batteries as things that push eletrons.

Two batteries connected in series: first one battery pushes on the electron, and then the next battery pushes on the same eletron. Each push of a battery on an eletron increases its potential energy. In this case, you making a circuit with a high voltage.

Two batteries connected in parallel: Here, each battery pushes on its own electron, each of which has only one battery's worth of voltage. This produces alot of electrons moving (current) as opposed to few electrons with lots of energy in the other case.

So in the case of the flashlight that you mentioned (let's assume in an old-fashioned one) each electron needs enough energy to pass throught the filament, where it loses its energy as heat.

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By adding parallel you can increase your output even when some batteries dead you have no dangers to lost equipments which are connected while in series direct difference of voltages act to appliances and it could be dangerous

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