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How does a translating object (with constant velocity) seems to have a rotatory effect when viewed from a point not in its line of motion?

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  • $\begingroup$ Note that movement in a straight line is also rotation - but with a non-constant radius. $\endgroup$
    – stafusa
    Dec 12 '18 at 9:43
  • $\begingroup$ @stafusa This can be misleading as rotation is absolute, while translation relative. $\endgroup$
    – my2cts
    Dec 12 '18 at 11:26
  • $\begingroup$ @my2cts You refer to fictitious forces? Since the OP explicitly cares only about how it looks like, I think we can restrict ourselves to kinematics. $\endgroup$
    – stafusa
    Dec 12 '18 at 11:36
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Your point of view is rotating, that is why.

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  • $\begingroup$ Actually, if the point of view is rotating, following the body, its movement will appear 1D, won't it? $\endgroup$
    – stafusa
    Dec 12 '18 at 11:38
  • $\begingroup$ @stafusa Its distance varies and it has an apparent rotation. It is actually the observer who rotates. $\endgroup$
    – my2cts
    Dec 12 '18 at 12:20

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