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I read Wikipedia and do not understand the following.

If you create pressure on the gas (or any spring) it gives pressure against. Why is the gas spring holding mass when pulled out, and while umounted does not extend to max length forced by the pressurized gas inside?

Typically, you see pictures with these springs being in "slide-in" state. Same I can see at home. The spring does not slide out itself.

enter image description here

Or maybe they are already in the slide out state?

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    $\begingroup$ "Why is the gas spring holding mass when pulled out, and whole umounted does not extend to max length forced by the pressurized gas inside?" This sentence is hard to understand. $\endgroup$ – Drew Dec 7 '18 at 2:31
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the gas spring exerts force even when the rod is fully extended because the pressure inside the cylinder is greater than atmospheric. I do not understand what you mean by "whole umounted".

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  • $\begingroup$ it was meant to be "while unmounted", a typo.. $\endgroup$ – J. Doe Dec 7 '18 at 12:53
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I have replaced such gas springs in my cupboard, and I can assure you that they do extend to their maximum, so that you need to compress them to fit between the mount points. If you have one such spring, and it doesn't extend, then it's broken (or past its end of life).

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  • $\begingroup$ so would you say, does the picture show compressed or extended springs? $\endgroup$ – J. Doe Dec 7 '18 at 12:52
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    $\begingroup$ @J.Doe when a spring is compressed, its internal rod is fully inside the container. So they are at least partially extended. Might well be fully extended, this depends on the actual maximum of each spring (rod length). $\endgroup$ – Ruslan Dec 7 '18 at 12:59
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You have to consider the pressure of the ambient atmosphere too. If you expand the gas in the cylinder so much, that its pressure drops below the ambient pressure, the net effect is a force trying to suck the piston in.

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