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Recently, the sleek cylinder of platinum-iridium metal has been discarded and the kilogram is set to be redefined along with ampere for electricity and Kelvin for temperature. Hereafter the Kilogram is dead and does it affect us in any means?

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closed as too broad by AccidentalFourierTransform, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, M. Enns, stafusa Dec 10 '18 at 12:46

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Short answer: no

Slightly longer answer: One of the primary goals of the BIPM is to ensure continuity in all redefinitions of the SI. So the numerical value of Planck’s constant chosen to define the kilogram was chosen precisely to prevent any discontinuity. In other words, avoiding any “day to day life” impact is an intentional part of the redefinition.

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The international kilogram prototype was just redefined because it lost some of its mass during the course of years. So just it was redefined to its initial mass. It does not have any significant impact on our daily life or on the previous calculations because the loss in mass was very small (approximately 0.000005 milligrams).

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