0
$\begingroup$

If I launch a rigid cylinder (or sphere, etc.) to the surface which has a coefficient of kinetic friction $\mu_k$ and static friction $\mu_s$ with some initial velocity $v$ I think it will decelerate and rotate (with slipping) because of kinetic friction. If after sometime, it reaches to the state of pure rolling, Does the kinetic friction changes to static friction? If it's true, does the pure rolling continue? I understand that static friction makes torque. But does it retard the translational motion of body?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

The interesting thing is that once the pure rolling condition $v=\omega R$ is reached there is no frictional force acting on the cylinder.
So the cylinder rolls along with a constant translational velocity (no net force) and a constant rotational velocity (no net torque).

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.