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The voltage developed along the semiconductor i.e perpendicular to magnetic field and current flow be used to glow a bulb? When hall voltage develops what happens to potential drop across the semiconductor? If we apply Kirchoff"s Voltage law,what voltage should we consider as potential drop?How is law of conservation of energy working here? Yes,many questions..

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    $\begingroup$ Voltage, from any source, is not sufficient to light a bulb. If you want to make light, then you must have a source of power. I don't know what law predicts the power that can be generated by a Hall effect device, but I imagine it must be very small relative to the currents and the voltages in the circuit where the device is used. $\endgroup$ – Solomon Slow Nov 19 '18 at 18:30
  • $\begingroup$ If not a bulb,atleast an led.. $\endgroup$ – Krishna Deshmukh Nov 19 '18 at 18:31
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    $\begingroup$ To get a hall voltage you need to run current though the semiconductor. If you want to turn on an led then why not run that current though the led instead? $\endgroup$ – KF Gauss Nov 19 '18 at 20:12
  • $\begingroup$ user157879@I am just asking for a possibility.Just turning the LED on isn't my goal here. $\endgroup$ – Krishna Deshmukh Nov 20 '18 at 13:34
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In principle yes, the piece of conductor in Hall effect can be used as a source of voltage that can supply some current, because if some charges are removed from the surfaces of the conductor, other ones will be supplied to maintain the equilibrium of electric and magnetic force on the charge carriers, similarly to chemical Volta cell, where charges will be resupplied to maintain equilibrium of macroscopic electric and electromotive force inside the cell.

Of course, the current drawn should not be too high, otherwise the current distribution in the conductor will change too much and the Hall voltage will drop. The longer the conductor (in the direction of the current), the higher the Hall current that can be drawn without appreciably impacting the Hall voltage.

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  • $\begingroup$ If we apply Kirchoff"s Voltage law,what voltage should we consider as potential drop?How is law of conservation of energy working here? $\endgroup$ – Krishna Deshmukh Nov 22 '18 at 3:51
  • $\begingroup$ If we connect a load to Hall's voltage source, the Hall voltage will drop somewhat. If it drops negligibly (load has high resistance), the voltage will be that given by the ordinary Hall voltage formula. $\endgroup$ – Ján Lalinský Nov 22 '18 at 21:16

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