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I am trying to understand Faradays law of Induction. As far as I know when we are speaking about the E field we mean the field caused by charges(stationary or moving) whose value we can calculate by coulombs law, or electromagnetic waves caused my accelerating charges.

So would it be correct to say that Faradays law of induction takes a property of the movement of electric charges(the change in magnetic flux through some loop) and relates it to a property of the electromagetic waves in space( the EMF around the loop caused by the waves).

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That’s the wrong way to think about it. Don’t focus on the movement of charges, because induction happens in electromagnetic waves far away from any charges.

Just think of it this way: A magnetic field that changes with time induces an electric field. That is what the equation

$$\nabla\times\mathbf{E}=-\frac{\partial\mathbf{B}}{\partial t}$$

(which you may not have learned yet) means.

Actually, an even better interpretation is “Wherever a magnetic field is changing at a point, there must also be a particular kind of electric field at that point.” You shouldn’t think of one as “causing” the other. The two fields are simply inter-dependent and can’t exist without the other.

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