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Let's suppose that a single battery is connected with a wire, which does not have resistance. Electrons will start to flow , in reality, with a wire with resistance, a potential difference would be generated across it. The current would build up until the potential difference is equal to the voltage of the battery. In the case in which potential difference is not created by the wire because there is no resistivity, the potential difference across will immediately become equal to that of the battery.

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marked as duplicate by The Photon, Aaron Stevens, Qmechanic Nov 4 '18 at 20:59

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First of all, there is no such thing as a wire with zero resistance. But let’s say there is. But any real battery has internal resistance. See the diagram below. Connected to the battery is a wire with zero resistance. Note that the current that flows in the wire (short-circuit) results in a voltage drop across the internal resistance equal to the internal electrical potential developed in the battery. The voltage across the battery terminals and thus the wire is then zero.

Hope this helps

enter image description here

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