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What kind of outdoor weather is ideal for condensing moisture that's in air?

Temperature, humidity?

Does condensation increase the more difference in temperatures there is?

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For the condensation to occur, a combination of high relative humidity and low temperature is required. But low temperature does not promote high humidity, so, to create favorable conditions for condensation, some sort of air movement is needed.

For instance, the transfer of warm moist air to colder areas leads to the formation of clouds and sea fog, while the transfer of cold air to moist areas leads to steam fog.

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Both temperature and humidity are factors. Warmer air can hold more moisture all other things being equal. That moisture condenses when the temperature drops to the saturation temperature corresponding to the partial pressure of the water vapor in the air. This is referred to as the dew point. To give an example:

Given atmospheric air with a dry bulb temperature 20 C (68 F) and relative humidity of 50%, from the psychrometric chart the dew point is approximately 9 C (48 F)

Now given the same relative humidity of 50% on a hot summer day, say dry bulb temperature of 32 C (90F), the dew point is approximately 20 C (68 F)

So, for the same relative humidity, the dew point temperature (condensation temperature) is higher when the temperature drops (e.g. overnight) for the hot summer day.

Hope this helps.

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