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Great scientists such as Kip Thorne have served as consulting physicists for the 2014 movie Interstellar, I watched it twice or thrice, But couldn't understand many of the scenes displayed. Does the film have any relation with reality or is it mindless Imagination? If there are underlying scientific explanations I would be more than willing to know them.

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    $\begingroup$ Try to focus your question a little more, make it about physics not about the movie. $\endgroup$
    – user190081
    Nov 3, 2018 at 15:31
  • $\begingroup$ Most of the movie is scientifically accurate until the last scenes with the Tesseract. It mostly relies on concepts from Einstein's (general) theory of relativity. Kip Thorne actually wrote a very nice book explaining the science behind it: amazon.ca/Science-Interstellar-Kip-Thorne/dp/0393351378 $\endgroup$ Nov 3, 2018 at 15:32
  • $\begingroup$ @user190081 my question is what is the physics behind the film what all phenomenons describe or correctly explain what is going in the film... $\endgroup$ Nov 3, 2018 at 15:36
  • $\begingroup$ More on Interstellar movie. $\endgroup$
    – Qmechanic
    Nov 3, 2018 at 15:38

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The movie Interstellar in particular is based on well-known physics phenomena, Kip Thorne even wrote an entire book devoted to explaining everything that happens in the movie with physics. An example is gravitational time dilation, which is why time seems to pass more slowly on Miller's planet (or whatever it is called) because it is in a point of the gravitational field, where the gravitational potential is much higher. The same effect causes GPS clocks to run faster, if we didn't account for this effect via correct programming of the GPS satellite system. The end of Interstellar can be quite confusing because it involves string theory and the fact that vibrating strings exist in multiple dimensions. But of course string theory is mathematically to complex for many of us.

So to briefly recap: yes, Interstellar is based on physics. If you want us to explain a particular scene you have to be more precise in formulating your question.

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