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Really any phenomena about matter pulling into something always results to one thing eventually with enough mass, a black hole. I understand that the Shapely attractor is oftentimes referred to as the largest object in the observable universe, but is that because not enough time has occurred for light to have traveled to us to be able to see other developed attractors in different galaxy clusters? I know that there have been unusually large black holes in the early formation of the universe, I think the biggest one having been formed only one billion years after the big bang with a mass 10 billion times that of the sun. With the earliest stars having been born 200 million years after the big bang, a black hole such as that would have to consume a handful of stars every year. Is it possible that these types of black holes are actually not that uncommon, and are the cause of all attractors in a galaxy supercluster?

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No. If the Shapley Supercluster is acting as a "great attractor", it's because it has a mass of something like $10^{15}$ or more solar masses, which is $10^{5}$ times larger than the largest supermassive black holes we know about. Most of a supercluster's mass is dark matter, with the rest being gas and stars. Black holes are a very small part of it. (Even our own galaxy has a mass of about 50 or 60 billion times the Sun in its stars and gas, with about fifteen or twenty times more mass in the form of dark matter. Supermassive black holes, despite the name, aren't really that massive.)

If black holes with massive of 100 billion or more times the Sun were being routinely created, we know about it: in order to get that mass into the black hole, you would end up putting out enormous amounts of radiation along the way, which would be visible as quasars. And, of course, we've measured the supermassive black holes in over a hundred galaxies in the local universe, and never found anything more than about 15 billion solar masses.

"Really any phenomena about matter pulling into something always results to one thing eventually with enough mass, a black hole."

Possibly, but it would take many, many times the age of the universe for that to happen to galaxy-sized collections of matter.

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