-2
$\begingroup$

Why rolling ball down an incline or ramp, stops on different spot everytime? I know about friction, gravitational and angular acceleration, but what makes the ball to stop on different place?

$\endgroup$

closed as unclear what you're asking by Aaron Stevens, sammy gerbil, M. Enns, Kyle Kanos, Jon Custer Nov 5 '18 at 13:47

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Can you give more information about your setup? $\endgroup$ – Aaron Stevens Nov 2 '18 at 17:41
  • $\begingroup$ what you mean by stops on a spot? It's something like where does the ball stops after leaving inclined plane? $\endgroup$ – Murillo Spadin Nov 2 '18 at 17:44
  • $\begingroup$ @AaronStevens Here is my setup: ramp with ball. Yes, the ball stops on its own. $\endgroup$ – deyanm Nov 2 '18 at 17:50
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Not clear. Your diagram shows the ball rolling down an inclined plane which ends suddenly, then falling a further height $H$ before striking the ground at a horizontal distance $d$ from the foot of the plane. It is not clear what happens to the ball after that. Are you asking why the distance $d$ varies from one trial to the next? Or why the ball finally stops at different distances after rolling along the ground beyond distance $d$? What (if anything) are you changing between trials? How much difference is there between the places at which the ball "stops"? What is the mass of the ball? $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Nov 3 '18 at 20:41
0
$\begingroup$

Where the ball stops depends on the initial conditions for your problem, as well as different characteristics associated to your system. Can we assume that the ball rolls down the ramp without friction? Where it lands will change depending on wether or not there is a coefficient of friction associated with the ramp. Also, initial conditions such as $v_0$ are important in determining where the ball will stop/land. Does the ball start off at rest and begin moving due to gravitational attraction? Or does it have an initial velocity when it starts rolling down the plane? Hopefully this was useful.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.