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Hi, does applying resistance to a potential divider affect the output voltage? For example, if I were to put resistor R midway across a variable resistor would output voltage still = (R1/R1 + R2) x E? Picture is an example of what I mean, for example would the Pd across R still equal the Pd if R was replaced with a voltmeter or would rules change to account for the added resistance. Perhaps I am misunderstanding the concept of potential dividers but responses would be great.

P. A I edited this question in response to a comment and I apologise if this question sounds stupid because I couldn't find any information about this.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Physics SE! Please note that homework-like questions and check-my-work questions are generally considered off-topic here. We intend our questions to be potentially useful to a broader set of users than just the one asking, and prefer conceptual questions. Can you try making a question about some concepts that you'd need to solve this problem? $\endgroup$ – user191954 Oct 28 '18 at 2:58
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Yes, you have to account for the added resistance. Here are some hints.

In a series loop the current at all points must be the same. The voltage drops across each branch of a parallel circuit must all be identical.

You have a pair of parallel resistors in series with a 3rd resistor. Find the equivalent resistance for the whole circuit, and thence the total current. Now use the current to calculate the voltage drop across the 3rd resistor.

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