-3
$\begingroup$

I might be completely wrong, but watching a documentary about time, the Einstein theory of relativity came up. From their explanation, time "slows down" depending where you are in the universe.

I have nothing against that, but I have heard many times that you can live longer if time slows down (this might not be a scientific sentence though, just heard it around and in movies). Now, if time is perceived differently from an observer's point of view, it is still the same time for you ( person inhabiting that part of the universe).

In this scenario, does the damage your body accumulate (which leads to death), slow down too? Would cells die slower and the whole cycle take longer to complete?

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I think your question is essentially "If time slows down somewhere in accordance with special or general relativity, does that mean all processes including aging slow down?" The answer is "yes". $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Oct 19 '18 at 19:56
  • $\begingroup$ So it is true that orbiting a black hole/place with "slower time" would make you live longer? why? I feel like cells themselves would take the same amount of time to complete processes, which is still "normal speed" from your point of view... $\endgroup$ – hey Oct 19 '18 at 21:23
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Not exactly. From your perspective you would live your normal lifespan. Clocks would all seem to run at the right speed. But your family back at home would, relative to you, seem to age faster -- and their clocks would seem to you to be running too fast. Probably if you think about this for a few days it will come into focus. $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Oct 19 '18 at 21:54
0
$\begingroup$

From your perspective, time does not slow down for you, but if you observe soemone else in relative motion to you, YOU perceive THEIR time to be slowing down as well as all the processes like death etc...but they do not perceive that their time is slowed. So you gain nothing actually :-)

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Ok so why do they say that if somebody goes near a black hole for a couple of hours, and then returns, the people on earth would be years older that the space traveler (not considering the traveling time)? Shouldnt they have aged the same amount of years? $\endgroup$ – hey Oct 19 '18 at 21:17
  • $\begingroup$ NO...if you spend some time near the gravitational impact of a black hole, you will not experience anything wierd, but when you return, people there (on earth for example) will have aged a lot more because their time went fast. They lived for months and you lived for one hour or something. But that only means that you lived smaller amount of time, you do not gain more of life, if you know what I mean? $\endgroup$ – Žarko Tomičić Oct 21 '18 at 16:19
0
$\begingroup$

You misunderstand relativity. When you move at high velocities, the observer would observe your time to be slower but you won't perceive any change in your time. This is based on the principle of special relativity. It simply puts that you cannot distinguish two inertial reference frames. If you would have been able to perceive time slowing for you, then you could distinguish between two inertial frames which is not possible.When you return, the observer would be older than you but you would have aged normally and would feel no extra life lived.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.