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This question is from Keith Stowe's Introduction to Thermodynamics book under Random walk. The question is something like this:

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I am aware that I am not supposed to post homework questions like this without any attempted solutions, but I am struggling to understand what the question is asking. So, what does it mean by more than 32% of ammonia molecules when I am not given the total number of molecules to begin with? Just a hint towards the right direction would be helpful.

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    $\begingroup$ Please do not post images of texts you want to quote, but type it out instead so it is readable for all users and so that it can be indexed by search engines. For formulae, use MathJax instead. $\endgroup$
    – user191954
    Oct 15, 2018 at 7:50

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Usually if the initial quantity is not given to you, that means it isn't relevant. In other words, you could assign $N=100$ or $1000$ or $10^{23}$ , it won't change the answer. You could either reason as to why this might be true, or try it out with different $N$ or $N$ as a variable (this is definitely the right way to go as you would do this even if you were assigned a particular value of $N$), and see if it depends.

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