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I am designing a particle accelerator for a class. I want to know how tight of a turn an accelerator pipe can make; is there a defined maximum? Is there a calculation that needs to be made considering the type of particle/energy of the particle/magnets available?

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  • $\begingroup$ Have you done much reading into how particle accelerators work? $\endgroup$ – Samuel Weir Oct 8 '18 at 16:22
  • $\begingroup$ Related: popularmechanics.com/science/a23151/… $\endgroup$ – user207480 Oct 8 '18 at 16:26
  • $\begingroup$ Related: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/62/… $\endgroup$ – user190081 Oct 8 '18 at 16:41
  • $\begingroup$ The first cyclotron was 5 inches in diameter. The 11 inch cyclotron exceeded 1MeV (protons). $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Oct 8 '18 at 16:50
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    $\begingroup$ Low-energy accelerators (cyclotrons and synchrocyclotrons) don't even have "pipes," per se. Particles are accelerated on a spiral trajectory in a cylindrical cavity within a pair of D-shaped electrodes ("dees"). $\endgroup$ – probably_someone Oct 8 '18 at 17:11
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Here is a hint: consider the Lorentz force and the centrifugal force. Those laws (for classical mechanics) are sufficient, it probably doesn't apply for particles near the speed of light.

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