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I am no expert on the fluid mechanics field, but I am interested in generating high rotational speed vortices for my little research project. I believe that if a high speed airflow coming out from a convergent nozzle is made to impact at an oblique angle a low speed airflow coming out from a divergent nozzle, the result will be vortices at high rotational speed. Is that possible and if so how can I obtain a quasi-laminar airflow out of these vortices? Assume airflow velocity lower than 0.3Mach.

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  • $\begingroup$ What are you trying to achieve? It would be great if you could edit your question and add information about your experimental setup, why you need to use converging and/or diverging nozzles, what you mean by quasi-laminar airflow, and why you need it. $\endgroup$ – Al Nejati Sep 29 '18 at 6:04
  • $\begingroup$ Dear Al Nejati. Please see my post below. $\endgroup$ – Eudes Sep 30 '18 at 21:04
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Thank you for your most valuable suggestions. I have learned that at the tip of an airplane wing vortices form when high pressure low velocity airflow below the wing tries to move to the low pressure higher velocity airflow above the wing. Also, by using compressed air in vortex tubes it is possible to generate vortices that can rotate at 1,000,000 revolutions per minute. At least one wind turbine produces these vortices (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WB5CawKfE2M), but it does not take advantage of the high rotational speed of these vortices because they are generated behind the turbine blades instead of their front. I would like to generate the vortices before they impact the turbine blades. On the other hand, it is well known that the lift force generated on an airplane wing or on a wind turbine blade is proportional to the square of the airflow velocity provided the airflow is laminar, i, e., non-turbulent. I believe it would be useful to convert high speed vortices into a laminar or quasi-laminar airflow and the to use the latter to increase the lift force either on aircraft wings or turbine blades. By quasi-laminar airflow I mean an airflow that has passed through the space. between very thin sheets and very closely separated among them, somehow straightening the streamlines. In order to generate the vortices, I would make the airflow pass through a convergent nozzle and through a divergent nozzle but following separate paths, and making the two output airflows collide at a certain oblique angle.

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