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We experimented with the Maxwell's wheel today and at the end we were asked about why does this apparatus stop since there is conservation of energy.
I did some research and apparently there is a type of friction called "rolling friction", wikipedia defines it as "the force resisting the motion when a body (such as a ball, tire, or wheel) rolls on a surface."
So is, in this case, the rope considered as the surface?

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The friction required for a ball to roll on a surface is a static friction, which prevents the ball from slipping. For instance, a ball would not roll well on ice.

Rolling friction, on the other hand, is not required for the rolling to take place - it happens because the contact between the ball and the surface is not perfectly elastic and because of some slippage and, as a result, some energy losses occur.

The rolling involved in Maxwell wheel is kinematically similar to the rolling of a ball rolling over a surface, but instead of the static friction, the slipping is prevented by the way the rope is wound around the axle of the wheel.

Most of the losses, associated with a Maxwell wheel, though, happen when it bounces back at the bottom, because the rope is not perfectly elastic. The losses during the rolling are relatively insignificant, since both deformation and slippage are minimal.

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