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Scenario: Having very little physics background (high school), and having forgot most of it, sometimes I catch myself thinking about some weird stuff. Today's though was: given a stationary light source (eg. campfire flames), is it physically possible for another light source (flashlight) to shine through it (given a high intensity)? With any sort of measurement, is it possible to detect the photons of the flashlight on the other side of the campfire?

Obs: I tried searching around in my old class books and on google, but could only find how to start a fire with a flashlight, which is not very useful in answering the question.

Obs2: I have no idea if this is the right place to ask it, but thought it might work.

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Can a light source transpose another light source?

This question is too general to answer definitively.

For instance, if we have two flashlights as light sources, the answer would depend on how exactly the two flashlights oriented relative to each other and will have more to do with their construction than with the light they produce. One thing we can say, though, is that their light beams can pass through each other without being affected by each other.

Your example with the flashlight and campfire is more concrete. You can find a lot of details on that topic, if you search for something like "Can fire cast a shadow?" Here is a link to one of the related articles.

In a nutshell, a fire will refract light, because it heats up the air (which changes its refractive index), and it will absorb or scatter some light, because it has some particles inside it (soot, vapor, etc.), but some light will get through and, if the flashlight is powerful enough, probably could be visible.

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