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When a conductor is moving relative to a magnetic field (for example a magnet falling in copper pipe, or a Eddy current brake in a train) , it is considered that the conductor moves, the conductor contains electrons, therefore the electrons are moving relative to the magnetic field, therefore EMF is generated.

My question is relative to the positive charges in the atom nucleii that are also moving relative to the magnetic field when the metal is moving, are they too generating a force ?

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My question is relative to the positive charges in the atom nucleii that are also moving relative to the magnetic field when the metal is moving, are they too generating a force?

The emf generated in a conductor due to its movement in a magnetic field will be acting or exerting some force on both negative and positive changes: free electrons will move, while nuclei with the rest of the electrons will stay put, due to the internal forces that keep the metal crystal together.

In this sense, it is no different than the electric field acting on negative and positive charges inside a conductor attached to a battery.

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it is considered that the conductor moves, the conductor contains electrons, therefore the electrons are moving relative to the magnetic field, therefore EMF is generated.

I think there's a misconception here that needs to be addressed. The fact that electrons are moving relative to the magnetic field means that there is magnetic force on the electrons.

(Induced) EMF (emf), on the other hand, is due to the non-conservative electric field associated with a time varying magnetic field.

Regardless, the fixed positive and negative charge carriers do have a magnetic force (of opposite sign) acting on them.

But remember, it is the mobile electrons can participate in a current through the conductor. When, for example, a magnet falls through a conductive cylinder, it is the currents (and associated magnetic fields) generated in the cylinder by the falling magnet that act to oppose the gravitational force acting on the magnet.

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