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Recently I got into an infrared (IR) photography using a modified DSLR in which the IR cut filter in front of the camera sensor has been removed. According to astrosurf.com the usual sensitivity of CCD and CMOS sensors ranges between 200 nm and 1200 nm.

I am looking for common materials that efficiently reflect and absorb the near IR radiation in the range from approximately 700 nm and 1200 nm. With this information it would be easier to compose stunning photographs including these objects. I am hoping to get some suggestions from your own experience or some physics/engineering tables or books that include this kind of information.

Below is a picture showing camera sensitivity to different wavelengths (astrosurf.com).

The second picture is a sample IR photo (of my own) made with 720 nm filter. Here we can observe leaves, grass and other plants reflecting high amounts of IR light which is represented as white, snow-like colour.

camera sensibility IR photo

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You need polished metal mirrors without the glass panel in front. Aluminium foil seems most convenient.

https://www.quora.com/Do-mirrors-reflect-ultraviolet-and-infrared-light-too

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I am looking for common materials that efficiently reflect and absorb the near IR radiation in the range from approximately 700 nm and 1200 nm.

In general, bright objects, i.e, the objects that reflect well visible light, will also reflect well the near infrared light and, similarly, dark objects, which have low reflectivity of visible light, won't reflect well the NIR light either.

In general, removing the cut IR filter will increase the total amount of the received light and, therefore, make your pictures brighter, and will cause some color distortion, since the NIR light is likely to change the RGB balance.

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