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If I am measuring the expansion from earth I would find the Hubble Law to apply. If I switch positions and locate myself to a far distant galaxy and then measure the expansion I would also see the Hubble Law apply. In other words I will see the universe expand faster the farther out I look no matter where I am. I assume this to be true.

There is no center since everyone else will see the same expansion from their "center" so in a sense all points are "centers".

Usually I see in "books" a physical analogy of "raisin bread dough expanding while cooking in the oven." This analogy disturbs me since it would not explain how Hubble's Law would apply no matter where you measure from.

Is there some other fundamental feature of space here that I am not understanding ?

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    $\begingroup$ Your understanding is correct, except for the "raisin bread dough expanding while cooking in the oven". The Hubble law would indeed apply to each raisin, except for those near the crust. So your physics is fine, but your cooking may need some attention... Also note that the Hubble parameter changes in time. $\endgroup$ – safesphere Sep 8 '18 at 20:35
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    $\begingroup$ @safesphere, why not post this as an answer? $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Sep 8 '18 at 22:22
  • $\begingroup$ @safesphere...ahhh...yes since now dark energy is dominating it does change with time...glad you pointed that out. Since I can't fix my cooking I thought of a 2 dimensional model that does expand at every point.....a rubber band laid out flat end to end with pennies attached an inch apart. Grab the two ends evenly from where you want the "center" to be and you get that effect. But I haven't come up with three dimensional model . $\endgroup$ – Sedumjoy Sep 9 '18 at 0:30
  • $\begingroup$ @nielsnielsen On a cooking SE I might ;) $\endgroup$ – safesphere Sep 9 '18 at 2:07
  • $\begingroup$ R dR d(theta) (physics laugh) $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Sep 9 '18 at 2:44

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