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Recently i studied vector's mathematical meaning (i.e the vectors transforms the same way as co- ordinate system) and our teacher introduced us to parity operation and how vectors transforms under it. A'=P A this operation changed both both x and y co-ordinates .I wanted to know how would parity operation look on a vector reprented by polar co-ordinate form

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  • $\begingroup$ What do you expect? The coordinate representation does change what the vector is or does. $\endgroup$ – JEB Sep 2 '18 at 16:39
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The parity operation in cartesian coordinates $$x\rightarrow -x, y\rightarrow -y, z\rightarrow -z$$ corresponds to \begin{align} r &\rightarrow r\\ \theta &\rightarrow \pi-\theta \\ \phi &\rightarrow \phi + \pi \end{align} in spherical coordinates.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thats actually what i need is there any reference or book in which i can get that in detail to study $\endgroup$ – user150854 Sep 2 '18 at 16:58
  • $\begingroup$ If you draw the picture you'll see it's obviously correct. Better than a book. $\endgroup$ – RogerJBarlow Sep 2 '18 at 19:39
  • $\begingroup$ That is upon parity the r remains same but theta and phi inverses ....and the angle of those are taken with respect to changed co ordinate axes right $\endgroup$ – user150854 Sep 3 '18 at 5:13

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