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Basically the title.

If I have a very cold aluminium plate (don't know the temperature, but enough to have frost) and put a glass pint glass on top of it with liquid inside of it will that cold transfer enough to the glass and then to the liquid to keep it cool?

I know glass is an insulator and electrons don't move as fast but i'm just looking to keep a drink relatively cold, not freeze it. Is this possible to figure out or will I just have to trial and error it?

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  • $\begingroup$ It is possible. Is that all you wanted to know? $\endgroup$ – Chet Miller Aug 29 '18 at 20:45
  • $\begingroup$ Is it possible for the glass to transfer enough heat to the aluminium giving the low surface area to keep the liquid inside the glass cool. $\endgroup$ – user2570937 Aug 29 '18 at 23:41
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it will, but not very effectively, because glass's thermal conductivity is relatively poor. a better idea would be to use a flat-bottomed aluminum drinking cup, wrapped with an insulating foam sleeve.

or better still, and possibly more fun, would be to figure out a way to dip that cold aluminum plate into your cup without 1) ruining whatever the plate is connected to and/or 2) poisoning yourself.

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Maybe I can suggest to put the aluminium plate above the glass because I think the air under the plate will cool down and will reach the surface of the drink. Maybe with the $pV = nRT$, as the temperature on the air inside the glass cools down, volume can't change because of the rigid behaviour of the glass and the plate, so pression will decrease: in this way the atmospheric pressure would be higher than that one in the little air on the glass and the plate will better plug the glass.

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