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In newtons ring experiment we place the lens setup below a microscope which is then moved vertically until the fringes can be seen.

In case of Determination of Cauchy's constants, we use a spectrometer. The spectrometer consists of a collimator which is mounted on the rigid arm and a telescope mounted on the rotation table arm which can rotate in a horizontal plane about the axis of the instrument. A prism table of adjustable height is mounted along the axis of rotation of the telescope.

Is there any problem if we use a telescope to view newton's rings?

useful info: newtons ring experiment link , cauchy constants experiment link

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you define the terms 'microscope' and 'telescope' in the context and mention the difference between the two? I've always thought we use microscopes to observe for the Millikan experiment. Perhaps the sources you linked use the terms interchangeably or are unreliable? I haven't looked at them too carefully though. $\endgroup$ – user191954 Aug 21 '18 at 4:13
  • $\begingroup$ ok there seems to some confusion regarding the use of Millikan's oil drop experiment so I have removed it from the question $\endgroup$ – Noel Saji Paul Aug 21 '18 at 11:59
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A telescope can be thought of as a microscope with a very long working distance between the subject and the objective lens. Such a long-working-distance microscope is used when the experimental setup does not allow for the microscope to be located close to the subject.

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I think that the link that you have given for Millikan's experiment is misleading in that the name normally used for the device which they call telescope in that link is in fact called microscope as in this link.

A telescope is a device which make distant object appear nearer and so they appear to be bigger.
A microscope is a device which makes very small objects appear to be bigger.

In the Millikan experiment you are observing very small oil drops and so a microscope is the appropriate device.

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