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Shouldnt there be observations where we never see the color of an object because none of their electrons existed in the space where photons would hit them ? Or does this not happen because of how many photos are traveling constantly ? and if we send a photon particle by particle(not even sure if we can), will we then have 50-50 chances to see the surface give color or nah? Coming from a comp sci major who's just curious about physics.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Emilio Pisanty, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, Jon Custer, Bill N Aug 13 '18 at 14:09

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ They don’t absorb or reflect 100% of the time $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Aug 9 '18 at 4:02
  • $\begingroup$ Oh.. so it is indeed a probability too ? But why don't we see such things in real life? $\endgroup$ – Yashank Varshney Aug 9 '18 at 4:08
  • $\begingroup$ Photons go flying by atoms all the time without interacting much. Otherwise it would be really hard to see the sun. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Aug 9 '18 at 4:09
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    $\begingroup$ of course we do see such things. look at our medical x-rays. if x-ray photons reflected or interacted with matter 100% of the time, we wouldn't see anything past our skin. $\endgroup$ – gregsan Aug 9 '18 at 4:10
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Please see this answer of mine to a similar question, "Why do electrons absorb and re-emit photons?".

Also look at the continuous spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, of which a tiny part is the visual, colored rainbow spectrum, the table on the right.

Shouldnt there be observations where we never see the color of an object because none of their electrons existed in the space where photons would hit them ?

We do not see radiation because of the photon scattering off an electron, we see the radiation emitted by photons interacting with the surface of the object at all levels, atomic, molecular, lattice. Objects have a dense spill over electric field at the surface, and photons can always scatter from it too, the lattice level.

Or does this not happen because of how many photos are traveling constantly ? and if we send a photon particle by particle(not even sure if we can), will we then have 50-50 chances to see the surface give color or nah?

There are zillions of photons in a beam of light. In addition color perception is a complicated higher level process in the retina of the eye. (this answer of mine talks about it)

If no photons are reflected towars our eye, we will see the color "black" for the object. We may also see "black" if most of the photons are absorbed by the atoms/molecules/ at the surface of the object, and too few arrive at our retina to register a color.

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