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This question already has an answer here:

I seem to misunderstand the whole concept of calibration bosons.

Let`s imagine a charged black hole. It does not let out anything that travels at any speed less than or equal to the speed of light, right?

So how can we even know the black hole is massive and it has a charge if nothing (which also includes all force-conveying particles) can be faster than light?

Okay, for quantum gravity there is no conclusive theory as of now, and the graviton is yet to be discovered experimentally. But what about the electric charge?

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marked as duplicate by Qmechanic Aug 6 '18 at 18:54

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  • $\begingroup$ Oh well, a dupe.My Google-fu seems to be worse than I expected. $\endgroup$ – hidefromkgb Aug 6 '18 at 19:03
  • $\begingroup$ "It does not let out anything that travels at any speed less than or equal to the speed of light, right?" - No, speed has nothing to do with it. There is no gravity inside a black hole, nothing to "escape" from. No singularity exists there at any moment of time (until time ends). The problem is that there the direction "out" is the direction in time to the infinite past. You can't get out from a black hole for the same reason you can't go back to yesterday, no matter how fast you move. In fact, the faster you move there in any direction, the faster you get in, not "out". $\endgroup$ – safesphere Aug 7 '18 at 8:05