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If all resistants have a resistance of $R$, find the resultant resistance between points $AE$.

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My Try: Since Points AB and AC have equal resistance, There's an equal current flowing through each branch. So points B and C have equal voltage compared to point A. So we can delete resistant between B and C. Similarly resistant between C and D can be removed. So the top branch would yield $3R$. Bottom branch would yield $2R$. Since those two branches are parallel. Then resultant would be $\frac{6R}5$. Is this method Correct? Or can we just seperate nodes at C as in the following diagram to make it 'less complicate'? enter image description here

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closed as off-topic by John Rennie, Jon Custer, stafusa, Kyle Kanos, glS Aug 3 '18 at 12:47

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Homework-like questions should ask about a specific physics concept and show some effort to work through the problem. We want our questions to be useful to the broader community, and to future users. See our meta site for more guidance on how to edit your question to make it better" – John Rennie, Jon Custer, stafusa, Kyle Kanos, glS
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Emil and welcome to the Physics SE! Please note that we don't answer homework or worked example type questions. Please see this Meta post on asking homework/exercise questions and this Meta post for "check my work" problems. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Aug 2 '18 at 7:26
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for letting me know. I'll ask for the concept instead of the answer. $\endgroup$ – emil Aug 2 '18 at 7:32
  • $\begingroup$ One thing to look for is symmetry. In this case what can you infer about the potential of the node midway between Band D and the potential at node C? $\endgroup$ – Farcher Aug 2 '18 at 9:11
  • $\begingroup$ They are equal. So we can break resistance in path BD into two $\frac{R}{2}$ 's and join midpoint of that to node C? Am I correct? $\endgroup$ – emil Aug 2 '18 at 9:33
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    $\begingroup$ "Since Points AB and AC have equal resistance, There's an equal current flowing through each branch." - This would only be valid if you stipulate that the (node) voltage at B equals the voltage at C. Concluding that which you stipulate is begging the question $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Aug 2 '18 at 13:01