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I have two similar questions:

1) I have heard, that a travelling wave can be understood as a superposition of standing waves. Can you exaplain this (some images would be wonderful)?

2) Can a superposition of a travelling wave and a standing wave give a standing wave (I suppose it cannot, but I don't knwo how to prove it)?

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    $\begingroup$ In (1), did you mean to say that a standing wave can be understood as a superposition of travelling waves? If not, the statement is incorrect: two standing waves will produce another standing wave. $\endgroup$ – V.F. Jul 19 '18 at 15:06
  • $\begingroup$ Consider either the energy or moment transport of the wave and the correct answer should be obvious. $\endgroup$ – dmckee --- ex-moderator kitten Jul 19 '18 at 15:59
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  1. Straight from Wikipedia:

    enter image description here

  2. A standing wave, by definition, has the property all points along the wave are moving in phase with each other. A traveling wave does not, in general, have this property. If we superpose the two, then two points A & B will move in a superposition of an in-phase oscillation and an out-of-phase oscillation; and it is impossible to add together an in-phase oscillation with an out-of-phase oscillation to get an in-phase oscillation. Thus, a standing wave superposed with a traveling wave cannot yield a standing wave.

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