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I observe that the blades are slanted to an angle, but if it produce a lower pressure in one region, is it not possible that the wind from both side will go in?

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  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "wind from both sides will go in"? $\endgroup$ – BioPhysicist Jun 23 '18 at 3:19
  • $\begingroup$ I observe that the structure wind blade will cause one side of the air to move faster than the other (not sure if I am correct) so I wonder why doesn't the air from the front and the back to rush in but instead only air rush in one side and producing wind the other side $\endgroup$ – Wen Wen Hoh Jun 23 '18 at 3:25
  • $\begingroup$ @WenWenHoh Are you referring to the fact that there is no strong draft behind the fan, but only in front of it? $\endgroup$ – Deep Jun 23 '18 at 4:44
  • $\begingroup$ That I wonder too, why isn't the movement behind the fan as great as the front $\endgroup$ – Wen Wen Hoh Jun 24 '18 at 5:45
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Take a ceiling fan. If the blades were not slanted, as the instantaneous momentum of the rotation will be in the plane of the blades, only the thin sides would move air, very inefficiently.

ceifan

Slanting the blades pushes air in a perpendicular direction to the plane of rotation , the air filling up the vacuum behind comes in the same direction as the one pushed, so an overall draft is established. The direction of the wind depends on the direction of the slant with respect to the direction of rotation.

A a draft is built up , directed where change of air is needed.

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