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Is it possible to make a quantum computer from a perfect random number generator. I'm wondering if anybody that's studied it could make one from that type of random number generator.

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    $\begingroup$ You might try asking this at SE.QuantumComputing. $\endgroup$ – Nat Jun 16 '18 at 17:10
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    $\begingroup$ You're thinking that since having random outcomes is a feature of quantum mechanics that a quantum computer is basically equivalent to a conventional computer with a perfect random number generator? Not enough space or time to give a detailed answer here, but the short answer is "no". They're not equivalent. $\endgroup$ – Samuel Weir Jun 16 '18 at 18:25
  • $\begingroup$ A quantum computer has randomness, but that doesn't mean it's only randomness. $\endgroup$ – knzhou Jun 16 '18 at 18:36
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    $\begingroup$ What is the motivation for this question? Why would you think this? $\endgroup$ – Ben Crowell Jun 16 '18 at 18:38
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No. Quantum computation is, for all what we (this is, most people working on quantum computing) know/beleive, strictly stronger than randomized classical computation. There is, however, no proof for that -- just as for most statements of that kind (and comparable strength) in computational complexity.

The relevant complexity classes are called BPP (classical randomized) and BQP (quantum computing), so you might want to search for what is known about equality vs. strict containment of BPP in BQP. Some information can be found, e.g., in the complexity zoo: https://complexityzoo.uwaterloo.ca/Complexity_Zoo:B#bqp , where it is stated that relative to an oracle, BPP is not equal BQP.

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