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I want to know, when the charges travel from higher potential to lower potential of battery through the circuit then the potential difference must diminish. As it was previously made by keeping more charges at one terminal (positive) in comparison to other terminal (negative), and now electrons (charges) move from higher to lower, so either potential difference must diminish or the polarity of the battery must be changed.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Bill N, Alfred Centauri, Emilio Pisanty, Cosmas Zachos, AccidentalFourierTransform Jun 12 '18 at 19:44

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean vanish? Your line of thought applies pretty well to capacitors, but there's more going on in batteries than "seperated charges". $\endgroup$ – Jasper Jun 7 '18 at 15:00
  • $\begingroup$ Usually, in standard alkaline batteries, the potential drops after usage due to an increase in the cell's internal resistance. The potential generated is actually a function of the chemical reaction itself, and is constant over time until the equilibrium is reached and the reaction stops. $\endgroup$ – user191954 Jun 7 '18 at 15:03
  • $\begingroup$ I don't understand what you mean by finish. There are two main sections of potential difference: 1) across the chemically reactive volume of the battery, and 2) across the volume outside the battery, characterized by the external circuitry (wire, resistors, capacitors, etc.) The sum of these potential differences is zero if traversed in one direction through the complete circuit. $\endgroup$ – Bill N Jun 7 '18 at 15:11
  • $\begingroup$ Is it correctly understood that you are asking why the potential difference does not become "depleted" while current flows? Thunk of a potential difference as a pressure difference you can have a pump pressing water forward without stopping. The battery has this same effect. It constantly brings new electrons to the negative terminal so that the potential difference is always kept constant. $\endgroup$ – Steeven Jun 7 '18 at 17:47
  • $\begingroup$ Before voting to close as unclear, I did give some time for the OP to respond in some way to the helpful comments. $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Jun 8 '18 at 2:37
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Thank u all...I was previously having misconception as I was not clearly aware of the reaction takes place inside the battery which the STEEVEN said..that brings new electrons to negative terminal.

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  • $\begingroup$ +1. This is correct. In the circuit (ie outside of the battery) electrons flow from low to high potential (from - terminal to + terminal), because potential is defined in terms of the direction in which + charges flow. Inside the battery electrons are "pumped" in the same "direction", from + terminal to - terminal. So electrons flow round a complete circuit including the battery. Unlike a capacitor, where the flow of electrons in the "circuit" reduces potential difference between the plates, and electrons do not flow between the plates inside the capacitor. (There isn't really a circuit here.) $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Jun 9 '18 at 0:41

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