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So in solid metals they atoms give off electrons, which are delocalised and hold together all the metal atoms. But that's not the case in liquid metals, right? What holds together the individual atoms of liquid metals? Does it work similar to liquid nobel gasses, so spontaneous dipol moments? Or is there something else, like a few delocalised electrons, but not enough to form a solid?

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"But that's not the case in liquid metals, right?" - That is the case. In liquid metals the fluid is still hold together by the same principle, it just happens that the heat energy in the material (vibration of the atoms) overcomes the energy that holds the atoms in place, but the metal is still pretty much sharing electrons.

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  • $\begingroup$ You may like to add some evidence, e.g. that liquid metals are still conductive of both electricity & heat, and they're still shiny. $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Jun 7 '18 at 15:50

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